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Rotary Club of Tiburon-Belvedere

Fellowship and Service

Address: 1600 Mar West Street
Tiburon/Belvedere, CA 94920
Phone: 415-789-0161

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

IN THE NEWS

Karen Glader welcomes new member Valerie Marsh to the club and gives her a Rotary pin.

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Rotarians have fun in the Day Before- Labor Day parade.

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SAVING MARIN'S FORGOTTEN YOUTH

George Landau introduced Zara Babitzke, of Ambassadors of Hope and Opportunity, who has changed the lives of 1,750 young people, many of whom were left without resources when they turned 18 and had to leave foster care.

Zara's Mission

“This Rotary club is very special to me,” said Zara, explaining that the inspiration for founding AHO was a Rotary speaker she saw at the San Francisco Yacht Club. In addition, when she was nominated and inducted into the Marin Women’s Hall of Fame, we sent a congratulatory donation, which she really appreciated.

AHO assists homeless and at-risk youths 18 to 25 who don’t have family or support. This age group represents one third of the homeless in Marin, and no public funding is available for them. They are from families that are abusive, incarcerated, drug or alcohol-addicted or perhaps intolerant of an offspring’s sexual orientation. AHO provides a comprehensive safety net of appropriate support and helps them at this critical juncture in their lives.

The organization is based on Mazlow’s model and has a three-tier hierarchy to define its work—personal well-being, leadership opportunities and giving back. It has 100 Alliance for Youth partners, who are businesses, organizations, and professionals, who offer their services pro bono. The top three things youths ask for are homes, jobs and dental care. “I’ve been homeless in Marin, and I come from a family like many of the youth we are helping,” said Zara, adding that she feels privileged to help youth who reach out for help so they can become leaders and contributing adults.

The young people she helps choose to give back in return for help provided, and they are working on their second project, Think Different, a town hall forum at Dominican University to discuss youth homelessness, 6 to 8 p.m., Monday, September 25.Senator Mike McGuire will be host. “The Town Hall Forum is a big deal,” said Zara.

She explained that all the money in Marin goes to adults who are homeless. “They’re the ones getting all the housing and support,” she said. A Stanford study, however, found that if youth don’t get support during this critical period, they are likely to end up homeless. The Marin Independent Journal recently ran a powerful article about AHO (Marin Voice), and Zara got responses from Senator Mike McGuire’s office, Marin County Superintendent of Schools Mary Jane Burke and other leaders. She added that it’s important for AHO to keep educating the community, because youth becoming homeless is a growing trend. If we don’t deal with the problem, it will fall to our children and grandchildren to do it.

“Do you need volunteers in the community?” asked Marianne Strotz.

“In specific ways,” Zara replied. “What we do is specific to what the needs are. They choose what they want to work on, and we help.” She added that great results come, when someone sees a youth with challenges as a person and individual.

Juliana’s Story

Juliana Steccone, 24, is one of Zara’s success stories. “I was living in my church basement in San Anselmo,” she said, explaining that she had been involved in a bad relationship, and her church sheltered her. The church was exhibiting AHO murals, and Juliana met Zara and got her card, but didn’t contact her right away. “I was hesitant,” she said. Then one day, she came across the card in her wallet and met with Zara the next day. “You call her and in 24 hours, you’re meeting with her,” she said, adding that Zara got her to fill out one sheet of information and state her goals.

Immediately after they met, she took on a leadership role, because she had church experience in leadership, but then she fell back into the abusive relationship and left. She escaped and returned to Marin, but she had to stay in the bushes near Scottsdale Pond in Novato at first and then slept in a relative’s car. She finally got into a shelter, got a job at Safeway, and “Things started to fall into place,” she said. Zara helped her along the way, and she got her first apartment in April. Now she’s heavily involved in planning for the forum.

Zara calls her a butterfly, because she’s spreading her wings. She was ordained as a deacon in the Presbyterian Church and is on track to get a degree in ministry. She wouldn’t have been able to do it without Zara’s help.

The forum is important. “We want community partners need to know that we’re a healthy new model,” she said, emphasizing that young people need support. She was in college and didn’t expect to become homeless, but then things happened, and she didn’t have anyone to help her.

Questions and Answers

Angelo Capozzi asked where young people get shelter, and Zara responded that Homeward Bound is one place, but it’s difficult for them to be with adults with different issues. “There’s no shelter for youth in this county at all,” she said, adding that shelters need to be age-appropriate. Otherwise they’re not safe or inspiring.

AHO reaches out for host families, who will take in a youth for a month or longer. She told a story about a girl who was referred to AHO by the Center for Domestic Peace, which provides shelter for one month only. The girl had been battered and beaten, and staff at the center reached out to Zara when she could no longer stay there. They met within one day at Aroma Café in San Rafael, where they feel could comfortable. The girl had a broken arm, so she couldn’t even go to Mill Street for shelter, because she couldn’t do the tasks required.

She wanted to be a nurse, so Zara called Job Corps, and someone answered the phone, which is unusual. The girl had to go in the very next day, but Zara had another commitment and couldn’t take her, so girl did it on her own, even though getting there was complicated. It worked out, but she needed a host family, and Zara found one who agreed to meet the following Sunday. She let the girl know there were no guarantee so she wouldn’t have false hope, but “They welcomed her like she was their long-lost daughter,” she said. The girl will graduate from nurses’ training at Job Corps in November, and she spends Thanksgiving and Christmas with the family.

John Kaufmann asked how many young people AHO helps and for how long. Zara replied that AHO serves 150 youth every year, and support ends after five years. The budget is $150,000 to $200,000 a year. “I don’t have a program assistant. This is my life’s work,” said Zara. “This is my calling. I love it.”

To find out more about Ambassadors of Hope & Opportunity, visit www.ahoproject.org.

Juliana Steccone, 24, is one of Zara’s success stories. “I was living in my church basement in San Anselmo,” she said, explaining that she had been involved in a bad relationship, and her church sheltered her. The church was exhibiting AHO murals, and Juliana met Zara and got her card, but didn’t contact her right away. “I was hesitant,” she said. Then one day, she came across the card in her wallet and met with Zara the next day. “You call her and in 24 hours, you’re meeting with her,” she said, adding that Zara got her to fill out one sheet of information and state her goals.

Immediately after they met, she took on a leadership role, because she had church experience in leadership, but then she fell back into the abusive relationship and left. She escaped and returned to Marin, but she had to stay in the bushes near Scottsdale Pond in Novato at first and then slept in a relative’s car. She finally got into a shelter, got a job at Safeway, and “Things started to fall into place,” she said. Zara helped her along the way, and she got her first apartment in April. Now she’s heavily involved in planning for the forum.

Zara calls her a butterfly, because she’s spreading her wings. She was ordained as a deacon in the Presbyterian Church and is on track to get a degree in ministry. She wouldn’t have been able to do it without Zara’s help.

The forum is important. “We want community partners need to know that we’re a healthy new model,” she said, emphasizing that young people need support. She was in college and didn’t expect to become homeless, but then things happened, and she didn’t have anyone to help her.

Questions and Answers

Angelo Capozzi asked where young people get shelter, and Zara responded that Homeward Bound is one place, but it’s difficult for them to be with adults with different issues. “There’s no shelter for youth in this county at all,” she said, adding that shelters need to be age-appropriate. Otherwise they’re not safe or inspiring.

AHO reaches out for host families, who will take in a youth for a month or longer. She told a story about a girl who was referred to AHO by the Center for Domestic Peace, which provides shelter for one month only. The girl had been battered and beaten, and staff at the center reached out to Zara when she could no longer stay there. They met within one day at Aroma Café in San Rafael, where they feel could comfortable. The girl had a broken arm, so she couldn’t even go to Mill Street for shelter, because she couldn’t do the tasks required.

She wanted to be a nurse, so Zara called Job Corps, and someone answered the phone, which is unusual. The girl had to go in the very next day, but Zara had another commitment and couldn’t take her, so girl did it on her own, even though getting there was complicated. It worked out, but she needed a host family, and Zara found one who agreed to meet the following Sunday. She let the girl know there were no guarantee so she wouldn’t have false hope, but “They welcomed her like she was their long-lost daughter,” she said. The girl will graduate from nurses’ training at Job Corps in November, and she spends Thanksgiving and Christmas with the family.

John Kaufmann asked how many young people AHO helps and for how long. Zara replied that AHO serves 150 youth every year, and support ends after five years. The budget is $150,000 to $200,000 a year. “I don’t have a program assistant. This is my life’s work,” said Zara. “This is my calling. I love it.”

To find out more about Ambassadors of Hope & Opportunity, visit www.ahoproject.org.

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CHANGING LIVES AT 10,000 FEET+

Bob Roberts is the Global Grant lead for a project to build greenhouses in the altiplano of Puno Peru. He thanked us for our contribution of District Designated Funds and reported that his club received more than $45,000 in DDF, and the district matched it.

The greenhouses take poor people who speak Quechua and live 10,000 feet and above in the Andes from subsistence farming to a market economy. “They’re off the grid as far as almost everyone is concerned,” said Bob. The El Rimac club in Lima is responsible for the project. “This is not our project; it’s their project,” said Bob. “We’re the money.”

Instituto para una Alternativa Agraria, an NGO in Cusco that is focused on agriculture in the highest level of the Andes, is also involved. They have developed several technologies, such as solar walls, and their work is geared to 5 million of the poorest people who live at the highest elevations.
Kusimayo, a group that promotes new and improved agricultural techniques, is involved as well. The founders are Laura, a lawyer, and Joaquin, who is from a family in Puno that was in the fish business. They wanted to do something to help and started Kusimayo. They found families who could benefit from greenhouses, started with five and sent people from Cusco to help the farmers set them up and learn how to market their businesses.

Families must meet three requirements to get a greenhouse. “What a family needs first and foremost is water,” said Bob. “If you don’t have water, you can’t have a greenhouse.” In addition, they must own their own land and be willing to put in sweat equity, which means making 1,800 adobe bricks and constructing the greenhouse. Everything is laid by hand.

A water system with pressure is important. It’s not difficult to get water, but a system needs enough pressure to make it work. Mentors from the institute in Cusco and their own peers teach the people how to operate the greenhouses. They grow a variety of fruits and vegetables, including tomatoes, strawberries and papayas, and “They’re continually planting and harvesting,” said Bob, adding that everybody works, even small children. They eat 60 percent of what they grow, which has improved their nutrition, and they take 40 percent to market. They say the greenhouses have changed their lives, and they say repeatedly, “Now we are independent,” Bob reported, and they also say yuspagara – gracias –thank you.

The next step is putting in solar panels to warm the greenhouses at night. “Heat is there during the day, but once the sun slips behind the mountains, it’s damn cold,” said Bob.

The department of Puno is the poorest in Peru, and 800 families want this kind of greenhouse. Previously, the economy was based on illegal coal mines, contraband from all over and drugs. “It changes their lives,” said Bob, explaining that greenhouses make a difference in a culture that has been neglected for hundreds of years.

Marianne Strotz asked if the pipes freeze, and Bob said no, because they’re insulated.
Bob added that one greenhouse with irrigation costs about $2,500 per unit. That’s about $1,200 in DDF
“How do volunteers get there, and where do they stay?” asked George Landau.

Bob replied that the project pays for them to get there by bus, and they stay with families. However, he added, instead of getting volunteers from the institute in Cusco, people who already have a greenhouse teach others now.

Charles Arnold asked about the soil, and Bob said, “It’s terrible soil. They use manure to fertilize it.”
Bob showed a video that past president Kent Campbell made, and it’s on the club’s Facebook page and You Tube. It shows what the visitors from Mill Valley saw, where the greenhouses are and the reactions of the people.

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MARK YOUR CALENDAR

GREAT GUEST SPEAKERS

September 6: Fellowship meeting at 5:30 p.m., no speaker

September 13: Caring for Children

September 20: Greg Chanis, Tiburon Town Manager

September 27: Rob Devlin, Automobile Historian, The Golden Gate Races of 1952-1954

October 4: Fellowship meeting at 5:30 p.m.

October 11: Jay Gardner, Wind + Wing Technologies. Wind-powered ferries on San Francisco Bay.

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  NOTEWORTHY EVENTS

Happy Hour: 5:30 p.m., Thursday, September 21, Servino Ristorante, 9 Main Street

Friday Night on Main: 6 to 9 p.m., Friday, September 29, Fireman's Dance with the Fundamentals

District 5150 Foundation Event: 5:30 to 9:30 p.m., Saturday, October 21, Madame Tussaud's Wax Museum, Fisherman's Wharf, San Francisco

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WHERE TO FIND US

Lunch Meetings
We welcome guests. If you'd like to hear a guest speaker or find out more about Rotary, please pay us a visit. We meet at the Tiburon Peninsula Club, 1600 Mar West Street, Tiburon, at 12:15 p.m., most Wednesdays, for
a guest speaker's interesting presentation and lunch (optional). Lunch & Attendance: $23, attendance only: $10

First Wednesday Evening Meeting
On the first Wednesday of the month, we meet at the Tiburon Peninsula Club, 1600 Mar West Street, Tiburon, at 5:30 p.m. We welcome guests, visiting Rotarians and friends for fellowship, camaraderie, a little Rotary business, hors d'oeuvres and a no-host bar. $15

Happy Hour
We enjoy a social gathering on the third Thursday of every month at 5:30 p.m. at Servino Ristorante, 9 Main Street, Tiburon. This is a no-host event—place and pay for your own order.

Board of Directors Meetings
Meetings of the Board of Directors are open to all members and take place on the second Wednesday of the month at 10:30 a.m. at the TPC.

Contact us at rotary@telli.com.

See our website at www.tiburonrotary.org

Send mail to Rotary Club of Tiburon-Belvedere, P.O. Box 220, Tiburon, CA 94920

Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tbrotary. Hope you "like" us!

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Scroll down to see our photo gallery of Rotarians at work and play!

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 ROTARY AT WORK

The Rotary Club of Tiburon-Belvedere supports a wide range of programs, with a focus on youth, literacy and community. We believe that reaching out to others makes a better world and encourage others to join us. Here's what we're supporting in 2016-2017.

Youth—Investing in the Future

• 10,000 Degrees: Funding for support and mentoring to help low-income students gain access college and succeed.

• Ambassadors of Hope and Opportunity: Support to provide a safety net of stable housing, guidance and community connections for young people 16 to 25, who are homeless or in danger of becoming homeless in Marin County.

• Audubon Canyon Ranch: Support for children from low-income urban neighborhoods to go on field trips and experience nature.

• Bel Aire School’s Liberia Project: Advice and support for the fifth-grade students’ ongoing projects to help their sister school in Liberia, thus encouraging altruism at home and helping children in a disadvantaged country across the world.

Dave Hutton Rotary Award for Service Above Self: An annual award to a graduating eighth-grader with a record of outstanding community service at Del Mar Middle School.

• Dictionaries: Full-color, illustrated children’s dictionaries for every third grader in local schools every year.

• Eagle Scouts: Financial support for Eagle Scout projects, thus allowing Boy Scouts to develop leadership skills and prepare to become tomorrow’s leaders.

• Global Book Exchange: Support for the Global Book Exchange in San Rafael, which collects lightly-used books and redistributes them to teachers at schools with limited budgets, disadvantaged families and nonprofits that serve children, as well as schools throughout the world.

• Rotaplast International: Support for volunteer medical teams to provide life-changing surgery for children with cleft-lip and palate in needy communities around the world.

• Rotary Youth Leadership Awards: Scholarships so high school sophomores and juniors can attend a special camp that guides them to develop their leadership skills.

• Educator of the Year Awards: Annual awards to outstanding educators in local schools, whose unique projects give children a worldview that encourages them to become good citizens.

• Trade School in Uganda: Funding to help a new trade school in Uganda purchase sewing machines and other equipment, so students can learn a trade and become employable.

Meaningful Projects—Service Above Self

• Canal Alliance: Support for a program that teaches immigrants to speak English.

• Marin Villages: Support for programs that help seniors age in their own homes. Members pay a small fee and can enjoy social get-togethers and access to volunteers for help with tasks such as getting to appointments, changing light bulbs or assisting with pets.

• Pathway Home: Support for a program in Napa County that provides residential treatment for veterans suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

• Service to the Community Awards: Recognition for people who serve the community in meaningful ways, but don’t often get acknowledgement.

• St. Vincent de Paul: Support for helping Marin’s neediest residents obtain nutritious food, affordable housing, meaningful employment and a voice in the community.

• Tiburon’s Green Team: Support for the volunteers who plant, weed, prune and trim landscaping in public places to keep our community beautiful.

District Designated Funds

Rotary's District Designated Funds helped establish this sewing shop in Esmeraldas, Ecuador. Photo: Courtesy of Keith and Holly Axtell

• Microcredit in Ecuador: Funds from the sale of raffle tickets associated with District 5150’s fall event earn District Designated Funds for our club. For the past two years, we have contributed our funds to a multi-district, multi-club microcredit project in Esmeraldas, Ecuador, which is training people in job and entrepreneurial skills and extending microloans to help them start small businesses and become self-sufficient.

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GALLERY


Proclamation

The Town of Tiburon issued a proclamation in honor of the Rotary Club of Tiburon-Belvedere's 40th anniversary, which we will celebrate in June, and the 100th anniversary of the Rotary International Foundation. Pictured, left to right, are George Landau, President Linda Emberson and Tiburon Mayor Jim Fraser. Photo: Marsall Gross.



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Visitor from Afar

Rehmah Kasule (above left), with President Linda Emberson) is the Immediate Past President of the Rotary Club of Kampala/Impala in Uganda. She took the opportunity to visit us when she was at a conference in San Francisco in October. In 2010, she received recognition at the White House for her work in empowering women and met President Obama. She then wrote a book, From Gomba to the White House. She shared an African proverb: “When you walk fast, you walk alone. When you walk with others, you go far.”

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MAKING KIDS SMILE

Marshall Gross donated two beautiful puppets that he won in a gift basket to Rotaplast's mission in Cebu City, Philippines. Dr. Angelo Capozzi (with the big dog) reports that the puppets are making kids smile every day before undergoing surgery, and the mission is going well.

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Tiburon Challenger

Charlie Oewel, representing the Rotary Club of Tiburon-Belvedere, accepted a generous check from Ashoo Vaid (middle) of Wells Fargo and tournament director Brendan Curry (right) at the conclusion of the Tiburon Challenger. The funds will go to the club's education projects. (Photo: Getty Images for Revd)

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Rotary welcomes Kimberly Brooks

District Governor Jeri Fujimoto (center) inducted new member Kimberley Brooks (right) as Kimi's sponsor, Joe Lavigne, looked on. Photo: Marshall Gross

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DAY BEFORE LABOR DAY PARADE

Tari Nix and friend pull wagons with books for kids from the Global Book Exchange, as Marianne Strotz walks alongside, wheeling a Rotary sign. (Photo: Marshall Gross)

To see more photos of the parade, go to www.tiburonrotary.org and click on "Photo Gallery."

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President Linda Emberson (left) of Tiburon-Belvedere and President Marilyn Nemzer of Tiburon Sunset hitch a ride with Michael Heckmann in the Day Before Labor Day Parade. (Photo: Marshall Gross)

Dana and Chester (left), making friends.

Winter in August was the theme of the Tiburon Peninsula Chamber of Commerce's mixer at the Boardwalk. President Linda Emberson took the prize for the most creative hat.

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Jon Rankin views the on-court action at the annual Bocce Ball Tournament, a fundraiser for Rotaplast International. (Photo: J. Wilson)

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Changing of the Guard

Thanks to President Marianne

President Linda Emberson (left) thanks outgoing President Marianne Strotz (right) for her two outstanding years of leadership with a special Rotary jacket, as Karen Glader, the club's new secretary, looks on. (Photo: Marshall Gross)

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Honors for Angelo

Dr. Angelo Capozzi (left) and Dr. John Kaufmann with a child who underwent surgery during a Rotaplast mission to Peru in May 2016. (Photo: Courtesy of Rotaplast International)

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Service Above Self

Dave Hutton presents the Capt. Dave Hutton Rotary Service Above Self Award to Kendall Hermann, graduating senior at Del Mar Middle School, for her outstanding performance in community service. The presentation took place at a special awards assembly in June. Photo: Marshall Gross

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Teachers of the Year

(Left to right) RUSD Superintendent Nancy Lynch, Bel Aire School's Kelly Morphy, Reed School's Ross Modlin, Rotarian George Landau and Erin Turner of St. Hilary School (photo: Marshall Gross)

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Carnaval!

Mary Kaufmann and Jon Rankin got into the spirit of Carnaval, a fundraiser for the Rotary Club of Tiburon-Belvedere. For more, see the photo gallery at www.tiburonrotary.org. (Photo: Marshall Gross)

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